Protecting and Restoring the Morro Bay Estuary.
macroinvertebrates

May Field Updates

seagrasses

    Fulfilling our mission to protect and restore the Morro Bay estuary for people and animals requires a lot of hard work in the field. Read on to see what our staff and volunteers are doing on the ground.   National Aquatic Monitoring Conference  Karissa, Estuary Program Monitoring Coordinator, attended the National Aquatic Monitoring Conference in Tampa, Florida. A highlight of this conference was seeing a freshwater spring bubbling into an estuary while on a kayak tour to look at seagrasses in the Gulf of Mexico.         Final bioassessment surveys completed We completed four more bioassessment surveys …

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April Field Updates: Monitoring

We trained volunteers in water quality monitoring to collect data such as temperature, pH and oxygen levels.

Bioassessment Training We kicked off our spring bioassessment season with our annual training. We had 27 volunteers attend.     Bioassessment Surveys The field season is underway. Four of our eight surveys for the year have been completed with the assistance of 13 dedicated volunteers.                 Subscribe to get the Estuary Program’s blog delivered to your inbox each week!  Donate to help the Estuary Program protect and restore Morro Bay.    

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Monitoring the health of local creeks with bioassessment

Volunteer surveys stream

Each spring, Estuary Program staff and volunteers gear up for Bioassessment, an important monitoring tool that allows us to assess the health of local streams to determine their value as fish habitat. We conduct monitoring at creek sites throughout the Morro Bay watershed, which involves collecting macroinvertebrate or “macro” samples (insects that are visible to the naked eye) and taking measurements of the health of creek habitat. Here’s what a day of monitoring involves. Water quality monitoring Upon arriving at the site, we use water quality meters to collect information such as pH, temperature, turbidity, flow, and oxygen levels. Fish …

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