Protecting and Restoring the Morro Bay Estuary.
storm water

Field Updates January 2019: Eelgrass, Stormy Monitoring, Wildlife

Once the water levels dropped to safe wading levels, we went out to check on equipment and measure stream flow on Pennington Creek. This is at the site that previously had a fish passage barrier. The barrier was removed over the fall, opening up miles of Pennington Creek for migrating steelhead trout. Partners at other organizations have seen returning adult steelhead in a few other creeks in the county, so we are keeping our eyes open for ones in our watershed as well.

    Fulfilling our mission to protect and restore the Morro Bay estuary for people and wildlife requires a lot of hard work in the field. At the Estuary Program, that often entails doing research, restoration, and monitoring work out on the estuary and along the creeks that feed into it. Read on to see what we’ve been up to during the past month. (Don’t miss the pictures of the creeks during our recent stormy weather!) Eelgrass January was a busy month for field staff. We started by completing our eelgrass permanent transect monitoring. We were excited to see a …

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Stormwater Runoff and Morro Bay

We’ve had a lot of opportunity lately to watch the rain come down. After it hits the ground, though, where does it go? Stormwater sometimes runs down a gutter before flowing into the street. It joins water that is running off other streets and sidewalks, and makes its way into a storm drain like this one. It picks up natural debris, like leaves and sticks, as well as anything else in its path. That water eventually drains out into Morro Bay. To keep yourself safe from fast-flowing water and higher bacteria levels, it’s a good idea to stay out of the …

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