Protecting and Restoring the Morro Bay Estuary.
Photograph Friday

Photograph Friday: Morro Bay Mystery Species Contest

Mystery species number 3

  Today, we bring you four photographs of species native to San Luis Obispo County. Do you know what they are? Share your guesses for a chance to win an Estuary Octopus mug!  Post your answer and tag us @mbestuary on Facebook or @MorroBayNEP on Instagram and Twitter. Use #MBmystery1, #MBmystery2, MBmystery3, and MBmystery4. We’ll be looking for your guesses through Wednesday, May 22. You will be entered into the drawing one time for each correct answer you submit. So, if you correctly identify all four species, you will be entered into the drawing four times.  The winner will be …

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Photograph Friday: Native Trees Around the Morro Bay Estuary

Red willow grow in and along many of our local creek banks. They help stabilize the creek banks, reducing erosion.

  In the springtime, an abundance of low-growing greenery and brightly-colored blooms draw our eyes downward. We gaze at the ground as we make our way past open spaces in our neighborhoods and along the trails that surround the Morro Bay estuary. We admire the beauty of the wildflower-filled fields and the bees, butterflies, and hummingbirds that visit blossom after blossom. The next time you notice a wildflower growing at the base of a tree, admire it fully. Then, look up. Spring’s splendor spans the full height of any Monterey pine or coast live oak. Some of our native trees …

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Photograph Friday: Elfin Forest

    The El Moro Elfin Forest is full of surprises. Although it lies just on the edge of a neighborhood, near a school, and close to busy South Bay Boulevard, it feels a world apart. The winding boardwalk path brings you to lookout points high above the estuary and salt marsh and then pulls you deep under the cover of pygmy live oaks in Rose’s Grove. And, though the preserve covers only 90 acres, it boasts eight distinct habitat types. (You can read about some of these distinct plant communities in our Native Plant blog series.) Each season brings new …

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Photograph Friday: Baycam Favorites from Summer and Fall 2018

Sunsets over the bay can be bring both bright light and an abundance of long shadows.

  The Estuary Program’s Morro Bay webcam, or Baycam as we call it, has what some might consider the perfect job. No matter the day or the hour, it watches life unfold on the bay, without any particular goal in mind.  It observes the scene as clouds move, fog rolls in and out, the moon and sun chase each other across the sky, and boats bob and dance as the tides change. It sees every single sunrise and sunset, capturing photographs along the way. In today’s Photograph Friday post, we’ll share some of our favorite Baycam pictures from this summer …

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Photograph Friday: Predators and Prey Around Morro Bay

A coyote stands, alert, in a field at El Chorro Regional Park.

    The Morro Bay estuary and watershed are home to many species of plants and animals. The ability of this small geographic area to support such biodiversity is part of what makes it special. The animals around Morro Bay form complex food webs in which some species are both predator and prey. The following images give a glimpse into these relationships.         If you have taken photographs that illustrate predator and prey relationships in or around the Morro Bay estuary, we’d love to see them! Post them to our Facebook page or tag us on Instagram. Subscribe …

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