Protecting and Restoring the Morro Bay Estuary.

Why do you love Morro Bay?

Why do you love Morro Bay?

We love the Morro Bay National Estuary. We’re inspired by the wildlife that lives here, the natural beauty of the place, the important role it plays for migrating birds on the Pacific Flyway, the seafood bounty it brings, the joy and peace that come from getting out on its waters. The list goes on.

Kayak at Sunset, Morro Bay 1Oct11

Kayaking Morro Bay at sunset

We wanted to hear why others love Morro Bay. So, we asked local filmmakers Simo Nylander and Tom Wilmer to interview over 20 locals whose lives are intertwined with the bay and the estuary.

20th Anniversary

Tom Wilmer and Simo Nylander (right) interview Stanley Stern and Jack McNeal (left) of the Baywood Navy

These stories give us personal reasons to continue to protect and restore this special place.

Kaila Dettman and Terry Hooker lived for a year on their sailboat on the bay. They remember staying on the boat during a big storm and feeling its power. Their son made some of his first memories here.

Kaila Dettman, Terry Hooker, and their son examine a crab

Terry Hooker, Kaila Dettman, and their son, Genoah, examine a crab

Tim Frein and Jack Moore of the Baywood Navy love the many different faces of the bay—the sand dunes, the scrub, the varied shorelines, Shark Inlet. For Jack, getting out on the water and exploring these places makes life worth living.

Tim Frein and Jack Moore of the Baywood Navy

Tim Frein and Jack Moore of the Baywood Navy

John and Virginia Flaherty get a kick out of the surprises the estuary offers, the flocks of sandpipers flashing across the sky, the harbor seals and sea lions that surface where you least expect them.

John and Virginia Flaherty talk beside the bay

John and Virginia Flaherty talk beside the bay

Mayor Jamie Irons fondly remembers taking his wedding photographs at Windy Cove.

Mayor Jamie Irons remembers taking his wedding photos at Windy Cove

Mayor Jamie Irons

Eric Endersby, Harbor Director, recalls herding a pod of dolphins out of the back bay.

Eric Endersby, Harbor Director

Eric Endersby, Harbor Director

Sharon Rowley is proud that three generations of women in her family have been captains of vessels on this bay. She and her husband John appreciate the fact that Morro Bay is still a working harbor, while the town and the estuary invite tourists and locals alike to relax and enjoy their time here.

John and Sharon Rowley

John and Sharon Rowley

As Sharon Rowley says, “It’s just always a good feeling being down here.”

To share in the good feelings, visit our website to watch and listen to these Bay Story interviews. If you have your own Bay Story, please send it to Rachel Pass at rpass@mbnep.org. You can also post it to our Facebook page.