Protecting and Restoring the Morro Bay Estuary.

Your Top Blog Posts of 2019

Your Top Blog Posts of 2019

 

During 2019, you tuned in to the Estuary Program blog to follow field work projects, to learn about local wildlife, to track the health of the bay, and to see how you can help the estuary and watershed. Today, we’re sharing the posts readers visited most often this year across these four categories. If you haven’t read them yet, now’s a great time to catch up!

Top Field Work Post

Field Updates February 2019: Wet weather, Eelgrass Restoration, and Creek Monitoring

This post shares rainfall totals, details the process of sediment sampling and analysis that we use, and explains our eelgrass restoration progress through that date. Check this post out to compare rainfall totals from early 2019 with our recent rains and get a sense for how far the eelgrass restoration patches have come. For more recent eelgrass information, visit our eelgrass archives.

A picture from the bridge at our monitoring site on Canet Road, overlooking Chorro Creek. What a difference a week and some good rain storms will do!

A picture from the bridge at our monitoring site on Canet Road, overlooking Chorro Creek, from February 2019.

Top Wildlife Posts

Morro Bay Wildlife Spotlight: California Sea Lions in the Estuary

Learn how to tell sea lions and seals apart, see how big and how fast California sea lions really are, and find out why they have their own dedicated dock in Morro Bay.

Top Wildlife Series

  • Be Sea Otter Savvy: Sea Otter Biologist Gena Bentall shares her knowledge of and love for these beloved marine mammals

The best sea otter picture is one where the sea otters aren’t looking at the camera because they don’t even know you’re there. The photographer who captured this shot stayed quiet and kept far enough away from the otters so they could carry on resting, as they need to do to stay healthy.

The best sea otter picture is one where the sea otters aren’t looking at the camera because they don’t even know you’re there. The photographer who captured this shot stayed quiet and kept far enough away from the otters so they could carry on resting, as they need to do to stay healthy.

  • Sea Slug of the Month: Nudibranch Enthusiast Robin Agarwal shares tips for finding and appreciating these tiny and unique inhabitants of the Morro Bay estuary

  • Monarchs in Morro Bay: Learn where to find monarchs on the Central Coast and see how you can help them survive

A monarch butterfly feeds on nectar from manzanita blooms. Photograph courtesy of JKehoe_Photos, via Flickr Creative Commons license.

A monarch butterfly feeds on nectar from manzanita blooms. Photograph courtesy of JKehoe_Photos, via Flickr Creative Commons license.

Top Bay Health Post

Sea Star Wasting Disease Monitoring Update

In 2013, sea stars began dying off in record numbers up and down the Pacific Coast of North America. Since then, scientists have been studying the causes and effects of the wasting syndrome that is believed to have caused the die off. Volunteers have also been monitoring the health of sea star populations all along the coast, including here in Morro Bay, through MARINe’s citizen science program. Learn all about it in this post.

Bat sea star (Patiria miniata).

Top Stewardship Post

The Truth About Sunscreen: Its Effects on Us and the Environment

Sunscreen helps us stay healthy and ward off skin cancer, but how does it effect the bay and the ocean beyond? Learn what types of sunscreen are the least harmful for wildlife, which to avoid, and why.

Aspen enjoying the summer sun safely with Zinc Oxide Sunscreen

What sunscreen is best for your skin and for the ocean? 

Happy reading and happy New Year!


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