Protecting and Restoring the Morro Bay Estuary.
things to do in Morro Bay

What to do in Morro Bay

Looking inland from the top of Black Hill in spring.

  Wildflowers are blooming, birds are singing, and the afternoon winds have been picking up speed. It’s definitely spring in Morro Bay! Every year during the spring and summer visitors stop by the Estuary Program office asking for the best spots to enjoy our beautiful estuary and things to do that will help them learn more about the area. We’re sharing some of our favorite what-to-do tips with you, too. Go birding Bring your scope or binoculars and visit one of the area’s numerous birding spots. Sweet Springs Morro Coast Audubon’s expanded Sweet Springs preserve in Los Osos is a …

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Cool Summer Fun Around Morro Bay

Here is Dennis testing out the new scope by zooming in on some harbor seals near the sandspit.

When temperatures rise during the summer months, it’s nice to find a place to keep cool while still having fun. Morro Bay offers sea breezes, recreation on the water, and hikes where you can catch some shade. Here are a few fun things to do in our special spot along the coast. Paddle to gain a new perspective If you like to be active and you don’t mind getting wet, go paddling. There are a variety of local kayak and paddleboard shops to rent from, and you’ll see wildlife like otters, seals, sea lions, pelicans, and cormorants in a new way …

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Look Who’s Swimming in the Estuary Program Nature Center…Trout!

The steelhead trout eggs were transported to us in protective netting.

  If you’ve been to the Estuary Program Nature Center, you’ve probably seen our Saving Steelhead exhibit. Many visitors stop and watch, entranced, as the fish dart by. It’s important for us to share the steelhead’s story. Steelhead (Oncorhynchus mykiss) are a special kind of trout. While they are genetically identical to rainbow trout, their behavior sets them apart. Rainbow trout spend their entire lives in freshwater. Steelhead trout hatch in freshwater streams and then migrate to the ocean. They grow big at sea, before returning to the stream where they hatched to spawn. Steelhead are a sensitive species. They …

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