Protecting and Restoring the Morro Bay Estuary.
morro bay watershed

Field Updates December 2021: Water Quality Monitoring and Local Steelhead Populations

A steelhead (Oncorhynchus mykiss) was captured from the Chorro Creek sub-watershed and measured before safely being released back into the water.

Steelhead in the Morro Bay Watershed  One of the fascinating creatures living in our local creeks is the South Central California Coast Steelhead (Oncorhynchus mykiss). This genetically-distinct population of steelhead is found exclusively from the Pajaro River to the Santa Maria River, and while historically abundant, they were listed as “Threatened” by the National Marine Fisheries Service in 1997 due to rapidly declining numbers. This species continues to struggle due to habitat loss, lack of water, and competition with invasive species.   Steelhead belong to the Salmonidae family, along with other species of trout and salmon. Steelhead are anadromous, meaning they are born in freshwater streams, migrate out to sea for several years, and …

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Creeks to Coast Cleanup helps Morro Bay and Beyond

Our hills have turned nice and green.

It’s almost time for the annual Creeks to Coast Cleanup September is Coastal Cleanup month. It’s a great time to get outside and take care of Morro Bay’s beaches, the bay itself, and the creeks that feed it. To help everyone take on this task, our friends at ECOSLO host an annual Creeks to Coast Cleanup. This county-wide effort stretches from the upland creeks, down to the lowlands, and out to the sea. Even inland cleanups help our coast It might seem strange to host a coastal cleanup inland, but it makes a lot of sense if you think of …

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Field Updates January 2020: Eelgrass Success and Creek Water Quality

This month, our field staff have been busy monitoring eelgrass success in the bay and water quality in the creeks that drain to the Morro Bay estuary. Eelgrass monitoring and restoration success If you spent time out on the bay in January, you might have noticed the really high tides. January 2020 had King Tides, meaning that the high tides were much higher than normal. These extreme high tides are mirrored by extreme low tides. We always take advantage of these extreme low tides to monitor eelgrass, as we have a wider window than normal to conduct our monitoring. Eelgrass …

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